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Middle Palace & Cloud Gate Open the Nose & Head / Relieve Sore Wrists with Crooked Pond & Shoulder Joint

Posted: Nov 2nd, 2012

This is the final week of autumn on the Chinese calendar, transitioning us out of the resonance with the Metal element and the meridians of the Lung and Large Intestine.  In this newsletter we will look at points on the Lung meridian for clearing head congestion and points on the Large Intestine channel for relieving wrist strain.



Middle Palace (Lung 1) and Cloud Gate (Lung 2)  Open the Nose and Head

Located in the groove below the ball of the shoulder joint on the chest, the first two points of the Lung meridian are exquisitely tender to pressure during colds and flus.  Middle Palace, also called Lung  1, is located between the first and second ribs, in the border between the shoulder joint and chest.  Follow this border up to where it meets the clavicle and you will find the hollow that forms Cloud Gate, also called Lung 2.  Pressure on these points with the tip of a finger or a pencil eraser is effective in clearing blocked nasal passages and sinuses.
 


Relieve Sore Wrists with Crooked Pond and Shoulder Joint

When shoulders are tight and have poor range of motion due to lack of stretching and too many hours in a sedentary position, the wrists often suffer.  It is not uncommon for patients to worry that they might have carpal tunnel when wrists are stiff and sore. Before concluding that the cause is in the wrists, I like to palpate Large Intestine 11(Crooked Pond) and Large Intestine 14 (Shoulder Joint). Tenderness at these points can suggest that stretching and improving range of motion in the shoulders may be what the wrists need most. There are many yoga poses that are helpful for opening these points and releasing tension in the wrists. Shoulder Joint is located in the space between the acromion and the humerus. Crooked Pond is found at the lateral edge of the elbow crease

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